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A pair of engineers have designed a wearable Electroencephalography, or EEG, device called the ‘Crown’ to analyze the activity of the user’s frontal lobe and help them maintain focus and boost productivity with the aid of music.

The device, from Neurosity, measures and analyzes the wearer’s brain waves with the help of eight EEG sensors. 

EEG is one of the most widely used non-invasive techniques for measuring neural activity. The technology essentially records the brain’s electrical activity through electrodes that are placed on the scalp.

Wearable 'Crown' Boosts Users' Productivity With Brain Analysis
The ‘Crown’ is essentially a brain-reading, music-playing productivity booster. Source: Neurosity

Depending on the user’s brain signals, the device will play music specially selected to boost concentration.

As the ability to focus is regulated by the brain’s frontal lobe, Neurosity’s ‘Crown’ device focuses on this region of the brain. The device is connected to an accompanying Neurosity Shift app linked to the wearer’s Spotify account.

Analyzing the brain and playing soothing tunes to boost productivity

So the Crown is essentially a brain-reading music player: the device analyzes the user’s brainwaves and then plays the most suitable music in order for them to maintain their state of focus.

As Yanko Design points out, the ‘Crown’ is similar to Neurosity0s previous brain-sending device, the Notion 2. That machine also minimized technological distraction by automatically muting notifications or ringtones on devices.

In a bid to help users stamp out procrastination, The Crown sends a ‘report card’ indicating their most focused moments and the times at which they were most distracted. 

EEG devices do have a reputation for falling short on their signal-to-noise ratio — meaning that readings are drowned out by background noise. However, Neurosity says its device uses the latest technology to enhance its devices quantifying rate. 

Any potential buyer will also be happy to know that the Crown doesn’t store any of its users’ brainwaves in order to sell them onto third parties — frankly a terrifying thought.

It would definitely be counterintuitive if a device designed for maintaining focus was sending data about your brainwaves to other companies, allowing them to ping targeted ads to users when they’re at their most suggestible.

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